Information

FALLOW DEER

IDENTIFICATION: A medium sized deer with more color variations than any other. Color range from white all the way to chocolate brown/black. During the summer months, most are rich brown with white spots, in winter, the coat becomes much thicker and rougher, turning a darker color. A broad black dorsal line runs from the neck to the rump, and broadens to include the tail. The under parts are lighter in color to white. Males have a prominent Adams apple.

Antlers: Only the males (stags) have antlers.

DISTRIBUTION: South Africa – Highest concentration Eastern and Western Cape.

HABITAT: Originally from Europe, but have thrived in thorned Savannah and mountainous areas. Can survive in a range of climates and habitats and even occur in the Karoo in great numbers along rivers and streams. Dependant on some kind of cover.

HABITS: Grazes and browses, depending on the area and the time of year. Very adaptable. Occur in small herds ranging from 5-15. Herds are made up of females, young and dominant stags. Stags have territories and are very aggressive during the rut, often debarking trees in order to mark their territories. Bachelor groups of stags are very common.

INTERESTING HUNTING NOTES: Fallow Deer from Europe where introduced near Cape Town, South Africa, in 1869. Since then numbers have increased dramatically and many have been trans located to various regions throughout South Africa. An extremely interesting animal to hunt especially during the rut, when stags can be heard calling and one can detect and stalk stags by the sound of crashing antlers. During the rut the deer lose all fear of humans and become obsessed with mating, hunting during this time can be one of the most exciting hunts to be a part of. The rut for Fallow Deer runs from March – June, hunters looking at hunting Fallow Deer in rut must be advised, the earlier in the rut the better. Stags lose their antlers towards the end of September into October, with regrowth starting almost immediately in spring.

  • Ave Age of Mature Stags: +/- 5 Years
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